Blogging Principles: Motivation

Click here to check this post out on my personal website.

Since there’s no Re:Creators or Kakegurui this week, this post is going to be a bit of an experiment. I’ve been wanting to talk a bit about my own blogging principles and how I approach blogging in general. I do this mostly because I don’t think I have the credentials to give true advice, but I wonder if talking about my thought processes might be helpful.

To start things off, I want to talk a bit about motivation. I’ve been writing posts on this blog for quite some time now and I often ask myself how I’ve managed to keep it up so long. Of course, I’ve been interest in anime for a long time now, but I want to go a bit further than that.

To help out, I want to also talk about a hobby of mine, solving Rubik’s Cubes. Speedsolving, as it’s called, is something I picked up in high school, and it’s one of those things I claim as a talent. On the other hand, writing is an area in which I’ve notoriously performed poorly. So why is it that I haven’t done more than a handful of Rubik’s Cube solves in the past 3 years, but I can continue to write blog posts every day?

My answer goes back to my original motivations for starting this blog. I started my blog for two reasons: I wanted to start a website and I wanted to improve my writing. The second piece is the important bit. As long as I feel like I’m continuing to improve and learn, I will continue to keep this blog alive.

If my motivation was to create a popular website or one that made me money, I’m sure I would have quit by now. My stats aren’t exactly impressive. This is why I make the comparison to speedsolving. These stats are similar to my solve times in that I’ve reached many points in my blogging timeline when my stats have plateaued like my solve times. If I treated blogging like speedsolving, I would have have stopped for the same reason at those points.

I think the greatest reinforcement I’ve felt so far was in a recent encounter with my family. I was asked to write a tribute to my mother and how she affected my life, and my parents told me that my writing had greatly improved. Sure, this doesn’t seem like much, but my parents berated me constantly about my writing skills when I was growing up. So to me, this change felt like acknowledgement that I had actually accomplished something. That experience made me feel like this blog was worthwhile.

That’s pretty much all I’ve got on this. As my final point, I want to say that I still feel like I’ve got a lot more to go. I’ve been trying to engage with the blogging community more in recent years because I want to learn from all of the other styles out there. Anyway, let me know what you think of this post and maybe I’ll think of more stuff for the future.

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17 thoughts on “Blogging Principles: Motivation”

  1. It’s kind of awesome that you have kept the blog going for so long and it is great that you’ve gained something from the experience. Although, I think being able to solve a rubik’s cube is also pretty amazing given I think I have only ever once fully solved one. I tend to get really frustrated with them and quit pretty fast.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. yeah, i try to do a lot of introspection, so i can stay on top of stuff like that. rubik’s cube is still a fun way to pass time. i was really slow at first, but it’s a lot of muscle memory and recognition, so it definitely comes with time.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh, cheers for your improvements then! Indeed, that is the right motivation, which is something I quite lack as I was dumb enough to start a blog without real reason. But that aside, solving rubik’s cubes as a talent? That’s nice, as I never really was able to solve it without a guide.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. haha nice. to be fair, my reasons for starting are probably more random than i let on, but i know how i approach other things and i wouldnt have been able to stay interested unless i had a decent reason to keep going. and i definitely had a lot of trouble with solving the rubik’s cube at the beginning too. my family had one lying around the house that i used to fiddle with a lot. to be honest, i solved a few times on my own, but the guides and methods i looked up were how i really got faster. though back then, the methods hadnt been developed as much as they are today, so there was still a lot you had to figure out on the fly.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I like this “experiment”. You should do more pieces like this if the scheduling for shows ever suits it.

    Like you, I created my blog out of a passion for writing and the desire to have my own little corner of internet, and now it’s become a real passion project of mine.

    It was interesting to hear your motivations! Keep up the good work man and keep improving!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thanks! honestly, the main reason ive never tried doing stuff like this before is because im very painfully aware of my shortcomings and i dont want to sound like im speaking from some kind of authority. ive actually got a couple of other ideas, but im not sure when ill have time to fully realize them. the next one will probably be about how i choose/change blog post formats if i can put it together.

      id be lying if i said i have a passion for writing. i think it’s one of the most annoying things in the world and i would absolutely ignore it if i could. but i recognize that communication through writing is an important skill to have, so i tried to find a way to bolster it.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I feel bad it’s hard for me to get a chance to keep up with all the blogs I follow. Haven’t visited yours in ages but I like this different piece from you marth. haha rubix cube introduced to that during our stream which btw we should do another reverse otaku at some point. You’ve done well to manage to blog every day, I am slowly getting there mostly five out of seven days a weeks, so I think that is pretty good considering.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. in your defense, im generally too self-deprecating to publicize my blog at all.

      this blog could very well have been a rubik’s cube blog when i started out. it was a big thing for me back then.

      to be fair, i would probably buckle under the pressure if i had to write posts like this one every day. episode reviews are the only way i can really sustain this.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I can never do a Rubiks Cube, they are pretty hard for me. I always try to keep blogging and look for any improvements. Even if I have to deal with my life struggle, I will continue to write. I hope you keep on writing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. it’s pretty tough when you’re getting started, but i think it’s mostly an exercise in patience.

      i kinda envy those who enjoy writing. perhaps i can eventually grow into it. for the time being, id say it’s a factor of enjoying the analytical aspect and seeing the self-improvement.

      Liked by 1 person

          1. That’s cool. I think I would fail on them since I get impatient and give up lol.
            When I first started blogging, I didn’t consider time being important. I was inexperience. You can tell from my writing in my early days.

            Liked by 1 person

  6. Good for you. Congrats on your progress when it comes to writing and blogging. Indeed, even when we’re better now in blogging that when we first started, there’s still so much to learn from the blogging community. Nice post to read. Keep up the great work. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

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